Extreme Geomagnetic Storm

Extreme Geomagnetic Storm

On May 7-8th, 2024, a large sunspot cluster complex on the surface of the Sun released multiple coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the direction of Earth. A few days later on May 10th, the first of the CMEs reached Earth, earning the status of an extreme geomagnetic storm, the first in over 20 years.

That night, the northern and southern lights shone brilliantly across nighttime skies around the world. For the aurora borealis specifically, it was witnessed as far south as Florida and Mexico.

The show continued through the weekend, only finally waning by the morning of May 13th.

On May 14th, just before the sunspot cluster rotated to the side of the sun not visible from earth, it released the largest solar flare of the current solar cycle.

For more information, visit the Space Weather Prediction Center.

|
Contributions by: Josh Reiter

Satellite imagery of this event:

Hover over the boxes to play. Click the images to view enlarged

Aurora Borealis Descending to the Mid-Latitudes Over the US

Description:

An extreme geomagnetic storm as a result of multiple coronal mass ejections from the Sun impacted Earth at the end of last week, creating stunning auroras that were visible in locations across the world where the northern lights are rarely seen.


Phenomena: Auroras

Satellite: NOAA-20 NOAA-21 S-NPP

Product: Day/Night Band

Instrument: VIIRS

Northern Lights From Over the North Pole

Phenomena: Auroras

Satellite: NOAA-20 NOAA-21 S-NPP

Product: Day/Night Band

Instrument: VIIRS

Immense Aurora Australis Circumnavigates the Southern Hemisphere

Phenomena: Auroras

Satellite: NOAA-20 NOAA-21 S-NPP

Product: Day/Night Band

Instrument: VIIRS